Know More, Score More / the more you know the better you'll score

Scoring tips for the 2016-2017 season

TIP 1: ALL STAR AND PERFORMANCE RECREATION TEAMS – LEVEL APPROPRIATE SKILLS

All Star and Performance Recreation teams must have a minimum of 4 level appropriate skills, 2 of which must be elite in order to be eligible for the high range in stunt difficulty.  The list of level appropriate and elite skills can be found here. A stunt skill that is performed in the exact same way twice will not count as a second level appropriate skill.  Each skill must be different.  However, different can mean the skill is similar, but the way its performed may have a different grip or start or end in a different position.  For example:  In level 2, “1/2 twisting inversion from ground level to prep level 1 leg stunt” is listed as an elite skill.  If a team performs a front walkover ½ twist up to arabesque at prep level, and performs a back walkover ½ twist up to scorpion at prep level; this would be counted as 2 elite skills.  These skills are performed slightly different; although, they both fall under the same type of elite skill.

TIP 2: STUNT & PYRAMID DIFFICULTY

All teams receive a score for stunt difficulty and pyramid difficulty. Teams must perform at least 1 stunt skill and 1 pyramid structure or skill to receive credit in each category. A stunt occurs as soon as one person picks up another person up off of the ground. A pyramid is when 2 top persons are touching. If you have a top person in a stunt, braced to a person standing on the floor; this is a stunt. All teams want to make sure they have a flyer touching a flyer to ensure pyramid credit.

TIP 3: HOW TO MAX OUT YOUR CREATIVITY

Creativity occurs when a team transcends traditional ideas, rules and patterns.  The stunt and pyramid creativity range has been split into 4 sections.  Originality and innovative skills can increase the score in the range, but are not the only factor of getting into the range.  When athletes go straight up into stunts and come straight down, teams will receive a 4.0-4.2. In order to get above a 4.2, teams must perform at least one load-in, transition or dismount in which the flyer is not just going straight up and down within their stunt sequence.  Teams will receive above a 4.4 when a majority of their sequences includes non-straight up and down load-in’s, transitions, and dismounts.  A team will receive a 4.7 or higher when all building skills defy traditional patterns. The use of non-level appropriate and level appropriate skills can be used in combination to enhance creative visuals.

TIP 4: HOW TO INCREASE YOUR TUMBLING SCORE

Teams are eligible for ranges in running tumbling depending on how many level appropriate passes their team performs in the entire routine.  The number of passes can be determined by adding up the number of level appropriate passes performed from the beginning until the end of the routine.  In order to increase your score in the range, teams should work towards increasing the percentage of athletes on the team that can perform a level appropriate pass, synchronizing skills, or performing specialty combinations.  A level 1 team that performs rippled Cartwheels, in comparison to a team that rippled Cartwheel-Back Walkovers, will score lower in the range because of the difference in difficulty (providing the same number of passes are performed).  A team that performs synched combination passes will score higher than both of the previous examples.

TIP 5: HOW TO SCORE IN THE HIGH RANGE FOR WORLDS TEAMS

Level 5 and 6 worlds’ teams no longer have to perform Running Tumbling Doubles in order to get into the high range.  Teams have the option to perform a specialty through to full, double or a specialty to double as part of the high range requirement.  In order for the pass to be considered a “specialty”, the pass must contain a flipping skill and a flipping-twisting skill.

TIP 6: HOW TO SCORE IN THE HIGH RANGE FOR TUMBLING

Teams are required to do 2 passes by ‘most’ (75%) to be eligible for the high range.  1 pass must be synchronized.  In order to obtain the appropriate number of passes required for the second pass, a judge will add up the number of passes that are performed throughout the entire routine.  Athletes can recycle passes in order to reach the second part of the requirement.  Teams this year that do not have ‘most’ of their team performing a synchronized skill, can be eligible for a mid-range score if they have ‘majority’ (51%) of their team performing the 2 required passes.  Teams that are aiming to score in the low range do not need to synchronize any passes.

TIP 6: HOW TO SCORE IN THE HIGH RANGE FOR TUMBLING

Teams are required to do 2 passes by ‘most’ (75%) to be eligible for the high range.  1 pass must be synchronized.  In order to obtain the appropriate number of passes required for the second pass, a judge will add up the number of passes that are performed throughout the entire routine.  Athletes can recycle passes in order to reach the second part of the requirement.  Teams this year that do not have ‘most’ of their team performing a synchronized skill, can be eligible for a mid-range score if they have ‘majority’ (51%) of their team performing the 2 required passes.  Teams that are aiming to score in the low range do not need to synchronize any passes.

TIP 7: HOW TO MAX OUT YOUR JUMP SCORE!

Teams must have ‘most’ (75%) of their team perform their jump sequence in order to receive credit above a 4.2.  In order to reach the maximum score, a team must perform a whipped through quad sequence with variety, or a whipped through triple plus an additional jump with variety, in order to receive a 5.0.  To receive credit for variety, a team must perform at least two different types of jumps within their sequence.  Types of jumps include:  toe touch, pike, front hurdler, and side hurdler.  There is no difficulty benefit to performing more than two types of jumps within the four jump sequence. (Teams want to ensure they are performing the two types of jumps that are the most technically sound to ensure a higher technique score, while maxing difficulty.)  Teams need to make sure that ‘most’ of athletes are performing the extra jump if they choose to do the 3 + 1 sequence.

TIP 8: SCORE IN THE HIGH RANGE: COED QUANTITY

Teams will only receive a 4.0 or higher for coed quantity if they perform a skill on the coed list with the appropriate number of coed groups, and use one of the entry options.  The three entry options are:  coed toss, coed walk-in, and coed front handspring ½ up.  Coed Walk-in requires a single base to grab under the top persons foot and lift the top person from an upright position on the ground to an upright stunt.  The top person is never released and naturally performs a ½ twist during the transition.  For a coed toss, a single base grabs the top person at the waist and tosses the top person from an upright position on the ground to an upright stunt.  The top person is released from the base during the transition.  A coed front handspring ½ up occurs when a single base grabs the top person at the waist and tosses the top person from an inverted position on the ground to an upright stunt.  The top person performs a ½ twist while released from the base.

TIP 9: RECEIVE CREDIT FOR DANCE DIFFICULTY AND TECHNIQUE

Teams will receive credit for dance difficulty and dance technique this season.  Teams should include multiple formations, varied levels, footwork, and fast paced movement within their dance to increase their difficulty score.  In order to achieve difficulty credit for fast paced movement, athletes should demonstrate movement on the eighth notes (‘and’ counts of the beat); ex. 1 + 2 + 3     4      5        6 + 7    8, instead of 1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8.  Teams that have athletes performing different complimentary parts simultaneously, and do not sync the entire dance will enhance visuals and difficulty score.

TIP 10:  MAX OUT YOUR TOSS DIFFICULTY SCORE

In order to receive 5.0 points for toss difficulty, a squad must perform synched or rippled tosses by the entire team, with the exception of up to 3 people, and 1 extra toss by 1 group during the routine.  Teams can choose to perform tosses with 4 or 5 athletes per group.  Athletes may take on the role of a top person, base, base, back spot, or front spot.   If a toss is not thrown, or there are 4 or more people that are not performing any role during the squad toss section, a team is not eligible for a score of 4.8 or 5.0.  All squad tosses should be level appropriate, but each group does not need to perform the same skill within the toss.  For example, if a level 3 team needs to perform 5 tosses; 3 are single twist tosses, and 2 are toe touch tosses; this would be appropriate for a squad toss. The extra toss that is required for the 5.0 range, is the only toss that does not need to be level appropriate, but still needs to be legal.  (All Star Prep, Traditional Recreation Teams, and Special Athlete teams are not allowed to toss.)

TIP 11: UNDERSTANDING YOUR ROUTINE COMPOSITION SCORE

There are 3 drivers that determine a Routine Composition score:  formations/spacing, seamless movement, and innovative/visual choreography.  Coaches want to make sure that athletes are in the appropriate formation for each piece of the routine.  This requires stunt groups to stay in the appropriate space throughout the performance of the building sequences, athletes must start and finish their jump sequence within an appropriate distance between team members, and spacing during standing tumbling is consistent. Teams that demonstrate seamless movement do not have athletes running from one side of the mat to the other.  Athletes should finish one section of the routine and be a few steps from their next part.